Real Patient Results

View Photos

How Long Does Botox Last?

Featured Image

How long does Botox typically last? 

Botox lasts for approximately 3.5-4 months on average though some people will have a shorter duration (3 months).  Fewer people will have a small lasting effect after 4 months.

What are some factors that can cause it to wear off faster—and conversely, how can you extend or prolong the results? 

Patients who exercise a lot or are overly expressive often complain Botox wears off faster.  To extend the effect of Botox your healthcare provider can use more units or a higher concentrated dose.

Does it wear off faster in certain areas of the face? 

Yes! Botox works the best in the frown lines (the “elevens”), followed by the forehead and has a shorter effect on the crow’s feet around your eyes, the lip lines and the platysma bands of the neck which cause neck lines.

How should someone prepare for their first Botox appointment? 

Best practices are to consult your healthcare provider ahead of your appointment for a consultation.  To help prevent bruising, do not take any medications that thin the blood such as aspirin, ibuprofen or fish oil unless you have been prescribed a blood thinner by your healthcare provider for another reason.  Be sure you can be upright for a few hours later and do not exercise right after your treatment. 

Are there any misconceptions or things people are often surprised by when it comes to getting Botox for the first time? 

People are often afraid of Botox and think that once they start they will not be able to stop.  That’s just not true.  You may choose to stop and the lines you had on your skin will eventually return but they will not be worse than they would have been if you had not used Botox. Botox helps to prevent lines from forming so it can be looked at a method to prevent wrinkles of the skin.  Many patients start in their 20’s to prevent wrinkles before they see them.  People think there is an age to start but really it is a clinical and aesthetic decision based on the way a patient uses their muscles of facial expression, not a specific age.


To read the full article with PureWow, click here! 

* All information subject to change. Images may contain models. Individual results are not guaranteed and may vary.